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Litoria piperata

Peppered Tree Frog

Conservation Status

EPBC:

Vulnerable

IUCN:

Critically Endangered

Calling Period

Possible
Yes
Peak
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Description

A small species of frog reaching up to 3 cm in body length. It has a dull green or brown back, with black mottling. There is a dark stripe from the tip of the snout to the eye and a light green patch on the upper lip below the eye. The belly is white. The pupil is horizontal and the iris is gold. Fingers are slightly webbed, toes are fully webbed, both with large discs.

Breeding Biology

Eggs have not been described, but were likely laid in small clusters at or near the surface of the water in slow-flowing sections of rocky streams. Tadpoles have not been described, but were likely to be similar to other species in the Litoria phyllochroa group in colour, habit and development time. Breeding season is unknown, but again was likely to be similar to other species in the Litoria phyllochroa group; breeding during spring and summer.

Similar Species

Looks very similar to Litoria barringtonensis, Litoria kroombitensis, Litoria nudidigita, Litoria pearsoniana and Litoria phyllochroa. These species can be distinguished most easily by their different calls and distributions, although research is currently underway at the Australian Museum that may reveal more about how to distinguish them.

Images

Photo: Marion Anstis

Photo: Marion Anstis

Calls

Distribution

Formerly found in the New England Tableland, but has not been seen since 1973 and has likely become extinct. It is possible, however, that it is not a true species, but may just be a different coloured population of Litoria pearsoniana. Current DNA work underway at the Australian Museum may reveal more about its status a species. It is part of the Litoria phyllochroa species group, which also includes: Litoria barringtonensis, Litoria pearsoniana and Litoria phyllochroa.

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