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Litoria nannotis

Waterfall Frog

Conservation Status

EPBC:

Endangered

IUCN:

Endangered

Calling Period

Possible
Yes
Peak
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Description

A large species of frog reaching up to 6.5 cm in body length. It has a light brown, olive-green, or grey back, with dark brown marbling or spots. The belly is white. The pupil is horizontal and the iris is gold, with black flecks. Fingers are slightly webbed and toes are fully webbed, both with large discs. The male has a distinct grouping of black nuptial spines on the base of the thumbs that help to grip the female during mating. They sometimes communicate by foot waving, which may be due to living near fast flowing streams where the sound of water blocks out any calling noise.

Breeding Biology

Eggs are laid as a cluster attached under rocks in streams. Tadpoles can reach a total length of up to 6 cm and are brown or grey with gold mottling, or uniform black in colour. They use their very large mouthparts to stick to rocks in order to avoid being swept away by flowing water. They often remain at the bottom of water bodies and it is unknown how long they take to develop into frogs. Breeding may occur at any time of the year.

Similar Species

Looks similar to Litoria lorica, Litoria nyakalensis and Litoria rheocola, but is larger and has more black nuptial spines than Litoria nyakalensis, has more mottling than Litoria rheocola, and is larger than Litoria lorica.

Images

Photo: Stephen Mahony

Photo: Stephen Mahony

Photo: Jodi Rowley

Photo: Jodi Rowley

Calls

Distribution

Formerly found throughout the Wet Tropics region of QLD, but has declined severely due to the amphibian chytrid fungus and is now only found at lower elevations within its former range.

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